New BFI Flipside title

BFI Flipside is to issue The Orchard End Murder, a film by Christian Marnham in a Dual Format Edition (DVD/Blu-ray) release on 24 July 2017. Set in an idyllic Kent village one balmy summer during the 1960s, The Orchard End Murder, an obscure British oddity from 1981, is a macabre tale of murder and mischief. This is the 35th title on the BFI Flipside label, which rescues weird and wonderful British films from obscurity and presents them in new high quality editions on DVD and Blu-ray. A young woman from the suburbs (Tracy Hyde, Melody), bored by a countryside tryst, wanders off to explore her surroundings. When she meets a gnome-like stationmaster and his towering, half-witted railway-worker friend (played by Casualty’s Clive Mantle), an initially strange encounter turns sinister among the trees of a nearby orchard.Written and directed by Christian Marnham and shot by Pete Walker’s regular cameraman Peter Jessop, The Orchard End Murder is a violent, darkly humorous thriller, unseen since it originally shocked UK cinemas audiences.

Eureka launches new world cinema range

Eureka Entertainment have announced today that it is set to launch a new world cinema sub-label under the brand name Montage Pictures, which will focus on delivering ground-breaking and thought-provoking world cinema from new and upcoming directors. The initial line up will include recent theatrical release Suntan (2016, Argyris Papadimitropoulos, Greece), an unpredictable psychological drama, full of suspense and humour, set on a hedonistic Greek Island; Rescue Under Fire [Zona Hostil] (2017, Adolfo Martínez Pérez, Spain), a directorial debut based on events that happened in 2012 in the north of Bala Murghab in Afghanistan. Continue reading

New Recording for Tiomkin’s Duel in the Sun

Tiomkin: Duel in the Sun (complete score): Speaking to the film composer Jerry Goldsmith at the National film Theatre some years ago, he pointed out to me that he had just seen the Hitchcock film I Confess with its Dimitri Tiomkin score. ‘Not the way I score films!’, he said. ‘Tiomkin did not allow a moment of the film to go by unscored — and silence gives contrast!’ One wonders what Goldsmith would have made of Tiomkin’s score for the King Vidor film Duel in the Sun, for which Prometheus CDs have now given us the world premiere recording of the complete score — at nearly two hours, over two discs. As the disapproving Goldsmith would note, there is hardly a moment that goes unscored in the film, and your reaction to this may depend on whether you agree with the new set’s producer James Fitzpatrick. That’s to say: Fitzpatrick as a young man or Fitzpatrick today, as he has changed his views. In refreshingly frank liner notes, he admits that he has long had a love/hate relationship with Tiomkin’s music but now has clearly come down on the ‘love’ side of that dichotomy. And for those who admire the rich orchestral scoring of the golden age of film music, this score is pretty hard to resist. It is full-throated, romantic fare with the orchestra used exuberantly throughout (Tiomkin was a master orchestrator, although he had help on this score). In fact, the composer’s approach is rather similar to that of Korngold – treating the entire film as an opera without words and underlining the dramatic points with maximum impact. The final effect is of a glorious wallow, particularly in the committed and full-blooded performance it is given by the City of Prague Philharmonic Orchestra and chorus, conducted by the ever dependable Nick Raine, non-pareil in music such as this.

Tiomkin: Duel in the Sun (complete score)/Prometheus XPCD180